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Testimony & Official Correspondence

Monday, March 13, 2006

 

In December, EWG outlined the environmental consulting firm ChemRisk's violated the ethical standards of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (JOEM) with their activities surrounding the 1997 paper, "Cancer mortality in a Chinese population exposed to hexavalent chromium in water." We urged JOEM to review the allegations we presented in our letter, alert the scientific community of the ethical breaches, retract the fraudulent article, and ban the scientists involved from publishing in your journal.

Key Issues: 
Tuesday, July 10, 2007

February 28, 2006

Andrew C. von Eschenbach, M.D.
Acting Commissioner of Food and Drugs
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857

Dear Dr. von Eschenbach:

Friday, June 15, 2007

EWG commends the professional staff and leadership at EPA for forging a stewardship agreement with major companies that will, if properly implemented, dramatically reduce, and eventually eliminate, pollution associated with the chemical known as PFOA, and related chemicals that break down to become PFOA and similar substances. These toxic chemicals pose numerous health risks, are extraordinarily persistent in the environment, and have already found their way into the blood of people worldwide, including most Americans.

Wednesday, June 6, 2007

A U.S. Decision Not To Comply Could
Put Other American Industries At Risk


Ken Cook [1] & Chris Campbell
Environmental Working Group


Washington, June 9—It is the big 'what if' question occupying Brazilian policy experts and legislators in the wake of their country's stunning victory over the United States at the World Trade Organization (WTO) in March.

Key Issues: 
Friday, October 26, 2007

Ken Cook and Chris Campbell [1]
June 9, 2005

U.S. taxpayers provided $264 million in 2004 to a handful of agribusiness firms through an obscure but controversial cotton subsidy program at the center of a fierce global debate over agricultural subsidies—a debate that has paralyzed international trade negotiations for the past three years. One company alone, Allenberg Cotton of Cordova, Tennessee, received almost $35 million through the program last year, and has collected more than $186 million since 1995.

Key Issues: 
Friday, September 14, 2007

An alternative for Brazil in case of non-compliance by the USA in the appellate decision on the cotton suit

Prepared by Maristela Basso and Edson Beas of the Institute for Trade and Development Rights (IDCID.org.br)

Key Issues: 
Monday, October 1, 2007

Citing a strong body of peer-reviewed evidence, EWG today asked the National Toxicology Program (NTP) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to list fluoride in tap water in its authoritative Report on Carcinogens, based on its ability to cause a rare form of childhood bone cancer, osteosarcoma, in boys.

Wednesday, June 6, 2007

Ken Cook and Chris Campbell [1]
June 9, 2005

U.S. taxpayers provided $264 million in 2004 to a handful of agribusiness firms through an obscure but controversial cotton subsidy program at the center of a fierce global debate over agricultural subsidies—a debate that has paralyzed international trade negotiations for the past three years. One company alone, Allenberg Cotton of Cordova, Tennessee, received almost $35 million through the program last year, and has collected more than $186 million since 1995.

Key Issues: 
Wednesday, June 27, 2007

Judge Edward Becker of the U.S. Circuit Court in Philadelphia was asked by Senate leaders to oversee negotiations around a compromise asbestos trust fund bill. In a letter to Judge Becker, EWG President Ken Cook argues that he has ignored the needs of people who are sick and dying of asbestos disease.


May 24, 2005

Honorable Edward R. Becker
19613 United States Courthouse
601 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106
By Fax: 215-597-7217

Dear Judge Becker,

Key Issues: 
Friday, June 15, 2007

19 MAY 2005 | DuPont was served Thursday with a subpoena from the Justice Department's environmental crimes unit requesting documents on a key Teflon chemical. DuPont has already agreed to pay up to $340 million in a civil settlement for Teflon pollution and is the subject of an EPA investigation into its coverup of studies of the chemical's health effects.

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