Chemical Policy (TSCA)

There is widespread agreement that the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), the principle federal statute governing the use and safety of the thousands of chemicals we are exposed to in our everyday lives, is broken and needs to be reformed.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been given responsibility but little authority to enforce TSCA. Enacted in 1976, this current law was broken from the start, grandfathering thousands of chemicals already on the market. This law is so broken and so weak that the EPA could not even ban asbestos, a cancer-causing substance that is still in use and killing thousands of Americans each year.

To date, the EPA has only reviewed a few hundred chemicals for safety. There are nearly 85,000 chemicals currently approved for use that the federal government and consumers know little to nothing about.

We need real toxic chemical reform that ensures protection of public health, especially to our vulnerable populations, and the environment from the hazards these chemicals pose.

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Americans expect the chemicals used in everyday products to be safe. But a chemical industry-supported bill introduced today by Sens. Tom Udall, D-N.M., and David Vitter, R-La., falls far short of what’s needed to protect us from toxic and poorly regulated chemicals.
 

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News Release
Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Consumers rightly expect that the chemicals used in everyday products are safe.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, March 9, 2015

States are leading the way when it comes to protecting people from dangerous chemicals. And it’s a good thing, because the federal Toxic Substances Control Act, on the books since President Ford signed it into law, is broken.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, March 9, 2015

Chemicals used in everyday products should be safe – right? States should have a role in regulating potentially toxic chemicals – right?

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, March 6, 2015

Updated data from the Center for Responsive Politics and lobbying disclosure forms filed with Congress show that the American Chemistry Council, along with chemical giants Dow, Dupont, BASF, 3M, Honeywell and Koch Industries, spent $69 million in 2014 to lobby legislators – up from $62.9 million in 2013 and $58.5 million in 2012.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, March 5, 2015

A groundbreaking study released today (March 5) concludes that endocrine-disrupting chemicals add at least $209 billion a year to the European Union’s health costs for diseases and disabilities associated with these chemicals.

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, February 19, 2015

When I heard earlier this week that a train carrying crude oil had derailed and exploded in flames near the West Virginia town of Mount Carbon, I had a sickening feeling of déjà vu.
 

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Energy
Article
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

In between blizzards, you may be thinking of installing insulation to save money and energy.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, January 13, 2015

The Elk River chemical disaster, which unfolded a year and four days ago, is one of those crises too terrible to waste.  Here are five surprising lessons we need to learn from the spill, which contaminated the drinking water of 300,000 West Virginians.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, September 30, 2014

California scored a big win for human health and the environment today (Sept. 30) when Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill to require labeling on upholstered furniture to tell shoppers whether it contains toxic flame retardant chemicals. 

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, September 25, 2014

The chemical “safety” bill that the industry’s allies introduced in Congress is far worse than the current outdated and inadequate law. Here are 10 reasons why legislation hailed as “real progress” by some presents real problems for consumers worried about dangerous chemicals in consumer products.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, September 18, 2014

EWG applauds Senator Boxer’s leadership in fighting for reform of our broken toxics laws and protecting public health.

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News Release
Monday, June 30, 2014

If oil and gas companies were injecting potentially toxic fluids into the ground near your home or your children’s schoolyard, wouldn’t you want to know about it?

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, May 29, 2014

The American Chemistry Council, a trade association of major chemical makers, is among the largest donors to a fund created to support Sen. David Vitter’s campaign for governor of Louisiana.

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, May 23, 2014

As Congress rushes to complete a new law that would seek to “reform” the decades-old Toxic Substances Control Act, political spending by chemical companies and their trade association has reached record levels, according to a new analysis by the Environmental Working Group.

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, May 16, 2014

Environmental Working Group President Ken Cook will be the featured guest and honoree today (May 16) at the annual Greening Our Children event hosted by the Children’s Environmental Health Center (CEHC), part of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

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News Release
Thursday, May 15, 2014

Last month, the EPA official responsible for reviewing the safety of chemicals used in thousands of every-day products was asked how many chemicals in use are so dangerous they should get a harder look by the agency to protect public health and the environment.

The answer?

1,000.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, May 5, 2014

A revised draft of legislation to update the failed federal law that regulates toxic chemicals, which was released by Republican Rep. John Shimkus of Illinois following stiff criticism of his initial proposal, makes only cosmetic changes to his first draft. 

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, April 28, 2014

The Chemicals in Commerce Act discussion draft circulated in the House of Representatives earlier this year claims to advance the public interest.  We don’t think so.

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, April 16, 2014

SAN FRANCISCO – The California Department of Public Health today announced its final drinking water standard for the toxic chemical hexavalent chromium made infamous in the film Erin Brockovich. The state’s new Maximum Contaminant Level of 10 parts per billion is 500 times greater than the level identified as safe by the California Environmental Protection Agency.

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News Release

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