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Water

Nothing is more important to your health and quality of life than safe drinking water and clean streams and lakes. Across the country, pollution from farms is one of the primary reasons water is no longer clean or safe. Agriculture is the leading source of pollution of rivers and streams surveyed by U.S. government experts, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Thankfully, if we make simple changes in the way we farm, we can take a big step toward clean water.

Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Central Valley Business Times

Published May 29, 2007

Some Central Valley farms are paying pennies for the electricity needed to deliver irrigation water, claims a report Wednesday from the Environmental Working Group, which describes itself as “a non-profit, non-partisan organization” that gets the majority of its funding from private charitable foundations.

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AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

The Fresno Bee, Mark Grossi

Published May 29, 2007

Farmers in the Westlands Water District are underpaying to the tune of $71 million annually on cheap electricity for federal water deliveries, says an environmental watchdog group.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Des Moines Register

Published July 14, 2007

Work on the 2007 farm bill comes at an exciting time for agriculture in America. Adding energy crops as a third major source of income, along with food and fiber, has the potential to profoundly change the economics of agriculture, boost incomes and revitalize the countryside.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

Making good on Administrator Lisa Jackson’s confirmation promise, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is moving ahead with its deliberations on whether to impose the first national limits on drinking water contamination by perchlorate, the main component of solid rocket fuel.

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News Release
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Minneapolis Star Tribune

Published September 18, 2006

The idea that agriculture has become a major source of pollution in the Mississippi River will startle many Midwesterners. But it's no surprise to the government's top environmental regulators.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

New Standard, Jessica Azulay

Published April 11, 2006

Every summer, a huge swell of algae spreads through the Gulf of Mexico and then dies, smothering aquatic life in its wake. Scientists have documented this expanding "dead zone" since the early 1970s, finding that in recent years it has grown to an average of 14,000 square miles of ocean.

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AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Chicago Tribune, Andrew Martin

Published April 9, 2006

A new study on Monday found that a relatively small percentage of rural counties – many of them in Illinois – are contributing most of the fertilizer pollution that is creating a summertime “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico, where massive algae blooms snuff out most aquatic life.

 

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

Farm Futures, Jacqui Fatka

Published April 9, 2006

Nitrate pollution in the Mississippi River Basin is a growing problem, creating a Dead Zone downstream for marine wildlife. A new analysis from the Environmental Working Group shows that the problem is more solvable than it ever has looked before if the federal government begins to focus conservation needs in the trouble area.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Nancy Cole

Published April 10, 2006

Farmers in 15 northeast Arkansas counties are among the top contributors of fertilizer pollution that creates a "dead zone" of more than 5, 000 square miles in the Gulf of Mexico, according to a study released Monday by the Environmental Working Group.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

New Orleans Times-Picayune, Matthew Brown

Published April 16, 2006

Louisiana's fishing industry faces an uncertain future after the pounding it took last hurricane season, but fishers know one thing is certain: Sometime this summer, a lifeless expanse of water about the size of Connecticut -- maybe a little bigger, maybe a little smaller -- will form off the state's coast.

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AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Delta Farm Press, David Bennett

Published May 4, 2006

In what could be the first significant shot fired in the 2007 farm bill debate, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) has released a report on how Mississippi River Basin (MRB) fertilizer run-off is contributing to a massive oxygen-depleted hypoxia zone in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Reuters

Published May 4, 2006

More than half of US streams are polluted, with the worst conditions found in the eastern third of the country, according to a study by the Environmental Protection Agency.

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AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Minnesota Pilot-Independent, Babe Winkelman

Published June 19, 2006

What grows larger with each passing summer and is roughly the size of New Jersey? The answer: the dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, one of the world's most dynamic fisheries.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Peoria Journal Star, Steve Tarter

Published June 25, 2006

It's an area the size of Connecticut that fails to harbor aquatic life in the Gulf of Mexico.

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AgMag
Article
Monday, September 21, 2009

 

Aberdeen American, Larry Gabriel

Published August 24, 2006

If you have not heard of it, you will. The mass media is blaming "agriculture" for a predicted increase in the size of the so-called "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Bakersfield Californian, Bill Walker

Published October 29, 2005

In his recent Community Voices column, the president of Westlands Water District blasted Environmental Working Group's investigation of the district's proposed federal water subsidies contract.

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AgMag
Article
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

Federal regulators are negotiating an agricultural water contract in the Central Valley, the latest of several dozen deals that could tie up water resources for the next 50 years. Thursday is the public's last day to comment on the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's proposal to renew its long-term contract with Westlands Water District, which provides water to some 800 farms in Fresno and Kings counties.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

After 50 years of legal infighting, a victor has emerged in California's water wars -- agriculture. A decade after environmentalists prevailed in getting more fresh water down the north state's rivers and estuaries to improve fisheries and wildlife habitat, farmers are again triumphant. Central Valley irrigation districts are signing federal contracts that assure their farms ample water for the next 25 to 50 years.

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AgMag
Article
Friday, September 18, 2009

Feds reopen talks after criticism from environmentalists.

Fresno Bee, Staff

Published January 14, 2006

Federal officials are reopening negotiations on the renewal of some farm water contracts after hearing critical comments from environmentalists and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

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AgMag
Article
Friday, September 18, 2009

 

United Press International, Staff Published January 15, 2006

BIG SKY, Mont. -- Environmentalists, fishermen and city officials are challenging the farmers and ranchers who have long controlled water resources in the West.

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Key Issues:
AgMag
Article

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