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Water

Nothing is more important to your health and quality of life than safe drinking water and clean streams and lakes. Across the country, pollution from farms is one of the primary reasons water is no longer clean or safe. Agriculture is the leading source of pollution of rivers and streams surveyed by U.S. government experts, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Thankfully, if we make simple changes in the way we farm, we can take a big step toward clean water.

Tuesday, May 6, 2008

For almost 50 years, the federal government, defense contractors and the chemical industry have worked together to block public health protections against a component of rocket fuel that can disrupt children’s growth and development, Environmental Working Group (EWG) told a Senate committee Tuesday.

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News Release
Monday, March 10, 2008

Immediate Release: Monday, March 10, 2008 Contact: EWG Public Affairs (202) 667-6982 WASHINGTON - A wide range of pharmaceuticals that include antibiotics, sex hormones, and drugs used to treat epilepsy and depression, contaminate drinking water s

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, January 17, 2008

A recent study by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found that three quarters of 285 commonly consumed foods and beverages are contaminated with perchlorate, a toxic rocket fuel ingredient.

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News Release
Thursday, November 8, 2007

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: November 8, 2007 CONTACT: Jovana Ruzicic, EWG Public Affairs (202) 939-9144 WASHINGTON - Environmental Working Group (EWG) Senior Scientist, Anila Jacob, M.D., M.P.H., praised the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee's

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, October 25, 2007

One of every 16 one-year-old children in the U.S. is exposed to the rocket fuel chemical perchlorate at levels above the government’s safe dose, according to an Environmental Working Group analysis of food testing data from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

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News Release
Tuesday, September 4, 2007

Due to lax standards and implementation problems, the conservation compliance program is missing cost-effective opportunities to make further, substantial reductions in soil erosion on U.S. cropland.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Environmental Working Group researcher Nneka Leiba explains the health concerns of fluoridated tap water and outlines what kind of filtering processes work best, particularly if you're bottle-feeding an infant using powdered formula mixed with tap

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Video
Monday, August 20, 2007

More than 64,000 children a day in Southern California will be exposed to an unsafe dose of fluoride when the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) begins adding fluoride to drinking water in October, according to an analysis by the Environmental Working Group (EWG).

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News Release
Thursday, August 16, 2007

In the four years since the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) decided to add fluoride to the tap water of millions of Californians, the American Dental Association (ADA), scientists at Harvard University, and the prestigious National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academy of Sciences have all raised serious concerns about the safety of fluoridated water for infants and young children. This steady stream of science represents a growing consensus within the mainstream public health and dental community that the health risks of fluoride in tap water may substantially outweigh the modest dental benefits of tap water fluoridation.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Saturday, August 4, 2007

Plenty of companies make water-efficient toilets these days, but replacing your old model with a newer one is an expensive endeavor -- and if you live in an apartment building, it's pretty much impossible. Here's an easy DIY way to make your toilet more efficient and save money and water at the same time.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 19, 2007

Thousands of years of history were revealed this summer as drought drained the water from Lake Okeechobee in the Florida Everglades. Native American tools and jewelery, a hundred year old fishing boat, and ancient human remains are just a few of the things that archaeologists have pulled from the lake's muddy, expanding shores.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, July 16, 2007

Thanks to Jack Nicholson's Oscar-winning performance in Chinatown, the story of how Los Angeles stole the water from the Owens River may be the best-known environmental crime in U.S. history. (OK, I'm showing my age. Chinatown is from 1971, and in 2000 Erin Brockovich also brought home an Oscar for Julia Roberts. Brockovich is above-average entertainment. Chinatown is art.) But finally there's a happy ending.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, July 12, 2007

EWG and East Bay Municipal Utility District (EBMUD) researchers analyzed samples of wastewater from residential, commercial, and industrial sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. 18 of 19 wastewater samples examined contained at least 1 of 3 unregulated, widely-used hormone disruptors – phthalates, bisphenol A, and triclosan; 2 samples contained all 3 substances. Despite sophisticated wastewater treatment, these chemicals were detected in treated waters discharged into the Bay.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, May 31, 2007

Answer: Stainless steel water bottles are the way to go, especially for hot liquids. Make sure your stainless steel bottle doesn't have a plastic liner inside, which may leach bisphenol-A (BPA), an industrial chemical linked to birth defects of the male and female reproductive systems and other health concerns.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, May 30, 2007

Every year, the Central Valley Project (CVP) moves more than 2 trillion gallons of water - about 18 percent of California's fresh water supply - to thousands of farms in the state's arid heartland. Massive pumps push the water through 1,437 miles of canals. The electricity used in one year to move water around the CVP would power all of the homes in Chico for more than 18 months, and at current Pacific Gas & Electric Co. rates, cost customers more than $100 million.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, May 29, 2007

Every year, the Central Valley Project moves more than 2 trillion gallons of water - about 18 percent of California's fresh water supply - to thousands of farms in the state's arid heartland. Massive pumps push the water through 1,437 miles of canals.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, May 16, 2007

He's back. Dennis C. Paustenbach, a.k.a. Dr. Evil, the science-for-hire consultant who rarely met a chemical he didn't like, is on the short list of potential appointees to the EPA Science Advisory Board Asbestos Panel. The panel has a crucial task: advising EPA's upcoming risk assessment for airborne asbestos, a killer that takes 10,000 American lives a year.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, April 25, 2007

A series of critical new studies by scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) show that the EPA's proposed safe exposure level for the rocket fuel contaminant perchlorate is not protective of public health.

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News Release
Thursday, March 29, 2007

An Environmental Working Group (EWG) analysis of recently published data from scientists at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Boston University (BU) shows that infants are being exposed to dangerous levels of the rocket fuel component perchlorate.

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News Release
Thursday, March 29, 2007

"Tests by the CDC and independent researchers have confirmed that many Americans are carrying the rocket fuel ingredient, perchlorate, in their bodies in amounts that lower thyroid hormone levels, in some cases substantially."

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News Release

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