Tap Water

Most Americans enjoy high quality drinking water, but contamination by agricultural pesticides and disinfection byproducts is a problem for others. Check out your water supply with EWG’s National Drinking Water Database.

Wednesday, August 17, 2005

Six West Viriginia and Ohio lawyers received the 2005 Trial Lawyer of the Year Award from the Trial Lawyers for Public Justice Foundation July 26 for their work on behalf of residents drinking Teflon-contaminated water from DuPont's nearby Washington Works plant. DuPont was sued for dumping the persistent Teflon chemical into community water supplies, although the company has known of its toxicity and potential to cause human health effects for decades.

Read More
News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, August 10, 2005

The Lovely County Citizen reports on one woman's winning effort to prevent the state of Arkansas from mandating fluoride in drinking water statewide, and on how one state official publicly mocked her at a conference cosponsored by the American Dental Association.

Read More
Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, July 27, 2005

Congress shot down a scheme to shield oil companies from lawsuits over MTBE water contamination after EWG published documents proving it was the industry's idea to add the suspected carcinogen to gasoline. It's a defeat with major repercussions for politicians like Rep. Joe Barton, who insisted on the bailout for Texas refiners, and Rep. Charlie Bass, whose support could have thrown out a lawsuit by his home state of New Hampshire.

Read More
News and Analysis
Article
Monday, July 11, 2005

A EPA draft risk assessment says MTBE, the gasoline additive that has contaminated drinking water in at least 29 states, is a "likely" human carcinogen, according to agency sources.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Monday, June 6, 2005

EWG petitions the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to evaluate cancer-causing potential of fluoride in tap water.

Read More
News Release
Friday, June 3, 2005

A major investigation by The Press-Enterprise of Riverside, Calif., reveals that an industry-funded study relied on by federal scientists to recommend a safe dose for perchlorate erroneously reported that healthy adults were not affected by low doses.

Read More
News Release
Wednesday, June 1, 2005

In a letter to all U.S. senators, the chief legal officers of 12 states from New York to California are urging lawmakers to vote against the federal energy bill or any legislation that protects oil companies from lawsuits over drinking water contaminated with the toxic gasoline additive MTBE.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Wednesday, June 1, 2005

In a letter to all U.S. senators, the chief legal officers of 12 states from New York to California are urging lawmakers to vote against the federal energy bill or any legislation that protects oil companies from lawsuits over drinking water contaminated with the toxic gasoline additive MTBE.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Monday, May 23, 2005

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has come out against a provision in the federal energy bill shielding oil companies from lawsuits over water pollution by the toxic gasoline additive MTBE — a stance at odds with his fellow Republicans in the California congressional delegation, who all voted for it.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Thursday, May 19, 2005

A recent news item tells the story of where the environment and public health rank in Washington’s priorities -- just about dead last. The Washington Post delivers the bad news in a grim headline: House Panel Receives Detailed Spending Plan for ’06; Legislators Among Groups Marked for Increased Funding as Ax Falls on Environmental Programs.

Read More
Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article
Monday, May 16, 2005

Despite Tom Delay and his lapdogs recent efforts to protect MTBE polluters, a federal court ruled MTBE producers and manufacturers must pay to clean up their mess.

Read More
Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, April 28, 2005

One California city is taking no chances on a toxic rocket fuel in its drinking water. Although neither the EPA nor the state has made a final decision on safe levels of perchlorate, the Associated Press reports that Rialto, a working-class Los Angeles suburb, is taking a zero-tolerance stance and shutting down all wells that have tested positive for the chemical.

Read More
News and Analysis
Article
Monday, April 18, 2005

House Republicans Are Expected To Block Amendments That Would Strip Their Polluter Immunity Provision From Energy Bill

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Monday, April 11, 2005

The NPRA's propaganda about our report is painstakingly crafted to confuse the issues, but it makes one thing perfectly clear: The oil industry is desperate to get the accountability shield, and scared of the facts that have already forced them to pay more than $250 million to two California communities whose drinking water was contaminated by MTBE.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Wednesday, April 6, 2005

In a move designed to please big oil companies, 26 Members of Congress voted in late 2003 to stop their own communities from being able to sue oil companies for polluting their drinking water with a toxic gasoline additive called MTBE. Since that vote, communities in each of those districts have filed suit for help with cleanup, and if Members vote again this year with Big Oil they will be voting away their constituents' right to sue. 

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Tuesday, April 5, 2005

California will keep its recommendation for the legal limit of the toxic rocket fuel chemical perchlorate in drinking water at 6 parts per billion (ppb), despite EPA levels set over four times higher, the Riverside Press-Enterprise reports. California’s level takes into account rocket fuel exposure from multiple sources, including milk, lettuce and other foods. It was adjusted to protect the most sensitive populations, including pregnant mothers, infants and children.

Read More
News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, March 1, 2005

DuPont Corp. has agreed to pay a settlement of over $100 million to residents of Parkersburg, WV, after knowingly contaminating their drinking water with PFOA, a toxic chemical used to make Teflon.

Read More
News and Analysis
Article
Friday, February 11, 2005

With the Bush administration dragging its heels on limiting mercury emissions from power plants, concerned New Hampshire citizens are calling for legislation independent of federal regulations, the New Hampshire Union Leader reports. A new bill in the state Senate requires an 80 percent reduction in mercury emissions in eight years, as well as a cap on carbon dioxide.

Read More
Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, October 27, 2004

The Washington Post reports that a toxic chemical component of rocket fuel, in concentrations 80 times what the Environmental Protection Agency considers safe for human consumption, has been found near a reservoir that supplies drinking water to the District of Columbia.

Read More
News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, October 27, 2004

According to news reports, Teflon maker DuPont reported earning $331 million in the third quarter this year. That amount will just cover the possible $313 million fine it faces for illegally hiding from the EPA studies finding that their Teflon chemical moves from mother's blood to baby and that it had polluted drinking water supplies used by thousands of Ohioans and West Virginians.

Read More
News and Analysis
Article

Pages

Subscribe to Tap Water