Sign up to receive email updates, action alerts, health tips, promotions to support our work and more from EWG. You can opt-out at any time. [Privacy]

 

Toxic Algae Outbreaks

Lakes, reservoirs, rivers and streams are a critical source of drinking water for millions of Americans. They also provide recreational opportunities and a habitat for wildlife. These bodies of water are essential to our daily lives.

Algae blooms, fueled by a changing climate and nutrient pollution, threaten many of these waters and they appear to be on the rise. What’s worse, in some cases these outbreaks produce toxic bacteria also known as cyanotoxins. Ingestion of these toxins has been associated with many health issues, ranging from diarrhea to cancer.

Currently, no government agency is tracking data on algae outbreaks for the entire country. EWG now tracks and monitors these algae outbreaks nationally in an effort to quantify their impact on drinking water, public health and the environment.

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

This summer, EWG is tracking outbreaks of potentially toxic algae across the U.S. We have been startled to find that these outbreaks are erupting everywhere: from the East Coast to the West Coast, from the Great Lakes to the Gulf of Mexico.

Read More
News and Analysis
Article
Friday, September 14, 2018

Outbreaks of potentially toxic algae in U.S. lakes, rivers, streams and even the Gulf of Mexico continue to rise sharply this summer, according to EWG’s ongoing tracking of algae outbreaks.

Read More
AgMag
Article
Friday, August 31, 2018

An unprecedented environmental catastrophe is striking Florida’s storied beaches, lakes and rivers this summer. Outbreaks of three separate strains of harmful algae are killing fish and other marine animals, threatening public health and devastating recreation and tourism.

Read More
AgMag
Article
Friday, August 10, 2018

Outbreaks of potentially toxic algae are rising sharply this summer in lakes, rivers and streams in the U.S., according to EWG’s ongoing tracking of algae outbreaks.

Read More
AgMag
Article
Friday, June 29, 2018

Millions of people could be exposed to potentially toxic algae blooms this July Fourth holiday.

Read More
AgMag
Article
Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Across the U.S., there is a growing epidemic of harmful algal blooms – also known as blue-green algae – polluting lakes, rivers and swimming holes, EWG reported this month.

Read More
Children's Health
Article
Wednesday, May 16, 2018

In 2010, there were just three reports of toxic blooms in the U.S. In 2015, there were 15, including the largest to date in Lake Erie, although the bacteria did not get into Toledo’s drinking water. In 2016, there were 51, including a huge bloom in Florida that prompted the state to declare an emergency in four counties on the Atlantic Coast. Last year, 169 blooms were reported. And in March, Ohio Gov. John Kasich declared the open waters of western Lake Erie “impaired for recreation” – an unprecedented designation that under the federal Clean Water Act will require the development and enforcement of plans to reduce toxic blooms.

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Across the U.S., a growing epidemic of toxic algal blooms is polluting lakes and other waterways, according to a new report by the Environmental Working Group.

Read More
News Release
Tuesday, May 15, 2018

In 2014, Toledo was the first U.S. city where a toxic algal bloom made tap water unsafe to drink. But it may not be last, says a new report by the Environmental Working Group.

Read More
News Release
Thursday, September 8, 2016

From Florida beaches to Lake Erie to the California Delta, algal blooms threaten human health and aquatic ecosystems. Cyanobacteria, commonly known as blue-green algae, produce toxins that can make people sick and even kill pets.
 

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Article
Thursday, June 30, 2016

What comes to mind when you think of the Florida coast? Sandy beaches, sunshine, warm water and … toxic algal blooms? 

Read More
AgMag
Article
Friday, October 9, 2015

Ripped from the pages of an obscure science fiction novel, millions run screaming from the threat of a toxic algal bloom blanketing almost 650 miles of the Ohio River. Regrettably, this story isn’t made up. Officials in the Ohio River basin are scrambling to deal with poisonous slime that may compromise the safety of drinking water, suffocate aquatic life and halt recreational activity for much of the region.

 

Read More
AgMag
Article
Subscribe to Toxic Algae Outbreaks