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Toxics

Industry doesn’t have to test chemicals for safety before they go on the market. EWG steps in where government leaves off, giving you the resources to protect yourself and your family.

Friday, February 24, 2006

Tomato giant Ag-Mart couldn't be in bigger trouble in North Carolina for alleged pesticide violations that may have caused birth defects in three field workers' children, but the state ag department says it's powerless to ensure that the company shapes up.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, February 16, 2006

The people who know DuPont best – its workers – have launched a website that pulls no punches about the company’s health and safety practices. “Throughout its history, DuPont has ignored scientific evidence whenever it threatens to hurt company profits,” reads the home page.

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, February 3, 2006

A new study from the University of California Berkeley found that combinations of low doses of toxic chemicals can be more harmful than any of the chemicals alone, suggesting that the vacuum EPA and other government agencies study individual chemicals' toxicity in does not mirror conditions in the real world.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, January 30, 2006

Today, a panel of outside experts gave draft comments to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) saying that an indestructible, toxic chemical that pollutes nearly every American's blood is a "likely human carcinogen."

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News Release
Wednesday, January 25, 2006

EWG commends the professional staff and leadership at EPA for forging a stewardship agreement with major companies that will, if properly implemented, dramatically reduce, and eventually eliminate, pollution associated with the chemical known as PFOA, and related chemicals that break down to become PFOA and similar substances. These toxic chemicals pose numerous health risks, are extraordinarily persistent in the environment, and have already found their way into the blood of people worldwide, including most Americans.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Friday, January 13, 2006

It is the category of industrial chemicals that, by consensus, scientists and government regulators the world over worry most about: substances that persist in the environment, accumulate in wildlife and people, and pose worrisome health risks for decades.

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News Release
Friday, January 13, 2006

An Environmental Working Group investigation of government and industry data shows that EPA has failed to require public disclosure of pollution data under the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) for at least 10 industrial chemicals that meet EPA's own criteria for classification as persistent bioaccumulative toxic (PBT) chemicals, a category reserved for chemicals that present the greatest threats to human health and the environment. One of these 10, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), was found in more than 95 percent of 2,800 people tested by the Centers for Disease Control in 2001 and 2002. 

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Los Alamos Lab contractor caught in scientific fraud: work on chromium contamination conflicts with ties to polluters.

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News Release
Friday, December 23, 2005

A consulting firm hired by Pacific Gas & Electric Co. (PG&E) to fight the "Erin Brockovich" lawsuit distorted data from a Chinese study to plant an article in a scientific journal reversing the study's original conclusion that linked an industrial chemical to stomach cancer, according to documents obtained by Environmental Working Group (EWG).

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, December 23, 2005

A consulting firm hired by Pacific Gas & Electric Co. (PG&E) to fight the "Erin Brockovich" lawsuit distorted data from a Chinese study to plant an article in a scientific journal reversing the study's original conclusion that linked an industrial chemical to cancer, according to documents obtained by EWG.

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News Release
Tuesday, December 20, 2005

Tap water in 42 states is contaminated with more than 140 unregulated chemicals that lack safety standards, according to EWG's two-and-a-half year investigation of water suppliers' tests of the treated tap water served to communities across the country.

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AgMag
Article
Wednesday, December 14, 2005

Today the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced it will fine Teflon maker DuPont $16.5 million for two decades' worth of covering up company studies that showed it was polluting drinking water and newborn babies with an indestructible chemical that causes cancer, birth defects and other serious health problems in animals. The chemical is in the blood of over 95 percent of Americans.

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News Release
Tuesday, December 6, 2005
News and Analysis
Article
Monday, November 28, 2005
News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, November 16, 2005

Breakdown chemicals from DuPont coatings and related sources are now in the blood of 95 percent of Americans, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has spent the last several years trying to determine how they get there.

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News Release
Wednesday, November 9, 2005

Environmental Defence Canada has released "Toxic Nation" the first Canadian BodyBurden study, with 11 participants tested for 88 chemicals, including PCBs, fire retardants, PFOS (a chemical in the same family as the Teflon chemical PFOA) and heavy metals, all of which are suspected of causing cancer, birth defects, or reproductive or hormonal harm.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, November 7, 2005

DuPont disclosed in its SEC filing last week that the company earns $1 billion per year in revenues from the Teflon chemical PFOA or C8. Those revenues could be in danger if EPA decides to regulate the toxic chemical as a result of the agency's lawsuit against DuPont for withholding information about the Teflon chemical's health effects.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, November 7, 2005

The University of Montana has put out its annual Kids Count report for 2005, addressing child mortality, uninsurance rates, economic status and, for the first time, health care costs from environmental pollutants. Montana spends an estimated $400 million annually for kids with lead poisoning, asthma, cancer, birth defects and other disorders.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, October 27, 2005

Prozac, antibiotics, health and beauty products, steroids, disinfectants, fire retardants, DEET, caffeine and more are increasingly being found in America's waterways.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, October 25, 2005

Residents near DuPont's W.Va. Washington Works plant, where the Teflon chemical PFOA is produced, are speaking out against a landfill where the company dumped the toxic chemical.

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News and Analysis
Article

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