Flame Retardants

For decades, foam furniture, baby products and electronics have been loaded with needless flame retardants that migrate out of products and into our bodies. These chemicals have been linked to cancer and hormone disruption, as well as deficits in motor skills, attention and IQ in children. Though the most toxic ones have been phased out in the United States, they were replaced with poorly studied alternatives that also could harm health.

In 2017, the Consumer Products Safety Commission initiated a ban on the most toxic additives in foam products and electronics, and warned the public, particularly parents, to avoid buying new foam or electronic products that contain bromine- or chlorine-based flame retardants.

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Today we invite you to join an important conversation about our nation's chemical policy - and how we're going to reform it. The fact that we need to reform the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) is hardly in dispute.

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Monday, May 11, 2009

Special to Enviroblog by David Andrews, EWG Staff Scientist

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Monday, April 13, 2009

Electronic recycling facility workers face 6-33 times higher exposure to toxic flame retardants PBDEs than the general American population, reported scientists from the University of Texas in an article now in press in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Thursday, April 9, 2009

Laboratory tests conducted for the Environmental Working Group (EWG) by one of the worlds leading scientific authorities on fire retardants found that in 19 of 20 U.S.

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Friday, April 3, 2009

EWG staffers were pretty thrilled by the recent Canadian government decision to ban the use of Deca, a type of flame retardant, in electronics. Once again, we are left applauding progress to the north, not at home.

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Thursday, September 18, 2008

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) welcomed today’s House Energy and Commerce Committee’s investigation of the chemical lobby’s role in pressuring the Bush administration to manipulate an Environmental Protection Agency panel reviewing the health risks of a toxic fire retardant.

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News Release
Thursday, September 4, 2008

In thehe first investigation of toxic fire retardants in parents and their children, EWG found that toddlers and preschoolers typically had 3 times as much of these hormone-disrupting chemicals in their blood as their mothers.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, September 4, 2008

In the first nationwide investigation of chemical fire retardants in parents and their children, Environmental Working Group (EWG) found that toddlers and pre-schoolers typically had 3 times more of the neurotoxic compounds in their blood than their mothers.

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News Release
Tuesday, August 19, 2008

In a stunning comeback for a bill that was on life support a week ago, the California State Assembly has approved first-in-the-nation legislation to ban from food wrappers and packaging a toxic Teflon chemical linked to a multiple health risks, including cancer.

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News Release
Monday, March 17, 2008

Two powerful chairmen of the House committee that oversees the EPA are launching an investigation into the chemical industry’s undue influence on Agency panels that recommend critical public health safeguards for chemical pollutants. The inquiry stems from documents released recently by EWG showing that the EPA sacked a respected public health scientist from the Maine Centers for Disease Control as a panel chair, at the request of the chemical industry lobby group the American Chemistry Council.

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News Release
Saturday, March 15, 2008

At the request of a chemical industry lobbyist, the Environmental Protection Agency removed the chair of an expert peer review panel charged with setting safe exposure levels for a toxic fire retardant that contaminates human blood and breast milk, according to documents obtained by EWG.

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Friday, February 29, 2008

Under pressure from chemical industry lobbyists, the Bush Administration fired the chair of an expert science panel at the Environmental Protection Agency that was evaluating the safety of a neurotoxic fire retardant, according to documents obtained by EWG. EPA is to issue by March 28th a reassessment of the human health risks from Deca, an industrial fire retardant used in electronics and other consumer products, and widely found in Americans’ blood and breast milk.

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News Release
Thursday, June 21, 2007

Question: Is it true that flame-retardant chemicals in upholstered furniture accumulate in women's breast milk? If so, what kind of hazard does this pose to an infant that consumes the breast milk?

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Monday, January 22, 2007

According to Seattle Post-Intelligencer, a man claiming to represent the Fallen Firefighters Foundation gave testimony against a PBDE bill. It was revealed that he worked for Ameribrom, a PBDE manufacturer. Shameless!

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Monday, January 22, 2007

New research confirms that people can take up brominated flame retardants (PBDEs) from the dust in their homes.

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Tuesday, November 7, 2006

A study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology finds that exposure to carpeting and other materials in the workplace significantly increases adults' risk of developing asthma. Carpet contains over 100 known toxins including benzene, formaldehyde, and flame-retardants. Added features like stain resistance increase the number of toxins.
[ via : Reuters ]

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Wednesday, May 24, 2006

The body burden ball just keeps getting bigger, this time with test results from 10 Washington residents, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports. The Toxic-Free Legacy Coalition of Washington State tested for the usual suspects -- fire retardants, pesticides, mercury, lead and phthalates -- among others, and found five to seven of eight classes of chemicals in each participant.

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006

If you're looking for couches with wood from sustainable forests, fabric free of flame retardants and finished off with non-toxic dyes, stains and glues, Q Collection makes them not just green, but also good-looking.

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Friday, August 19, 2005

A study recently published in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology finds that up to 80% of a child's exposure to toxic flame retardant chemicals could come from household dust.

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Thursday, February 17, 2005

New tests by Toronto's Globe and Mail and CTV News show some of the world's highest levels of chemical fire retardants in common Canadian foods.

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