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Flame Retardants

For decades, foam furniture, baby products and electronics have been loaded with needless flame retardants that migrate out of products and into our bodies. These chemicals have been linked to cancer and hormone disruption, as well as deficits in motor skills, attention and IQ in children. Though the most toxic ones have been phased out in the United States, they were replaced with poorly studied alternatives that also could harm health.

In 2017, the Consumer Products Safety Commission initiated a ban on the most toxic additives in foam products and electronics, and warned the public, particularly parents, to avoid buying new foam or electronic products that contain bromine- or chlorine-based flame retardants.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

When Dr. Brandon E. Boor and his colleagues tested 20 new and used crib mattresses purchased in 2011 or earlier, they detected two classes of chemicals associated with endocrine disruption and harm to the reproductive system and development: flame retardants and phthalates.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, November 30, 2017

During the first few years of their lives, infants can spend most of their time sleeping or crawling in the crib. Choosing children’s products that are good for air quality in the baby’s room can be a difficult task.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, October 5, 2017

San Francisco could soon become the first U.S. city to prohibit chemical flame retardants in all new upholstered furniture and children’s products sold in the city, including online sales.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, September 21, 2017

For decades, Americans have been needlessly exposed to chemical flame retardants – which have been linked to cancer, hormone disruption and other health effects – all because of a well intentioned but ultimately misguided California regulation from 1975.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, September 20, 2017

In a major victory for children's environmental health, the Consumer Product Safety Commission voted today to ban an entire class of toxic flame retardant chemicals from consumer goods, including children’s products, mattresses, upholstered furniture and electronics casings.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, September 14, 2017
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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, July 11, 2017

Brominated flame retardant chemicals, banned in the U.S. since 2004, still pollute the bodies of newborn American babies, according to a new study from Indiana University scientists.

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Levels of a cancer-causing flame retardant are increasing dramatically in the bodies of American adults and children, according to a new study led by Duke University scientists, in collaboration with researchers at EWG and other universities. 
 

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News Release
Monday, September 26, 2016

When EWG and other environmental health advocates began raising alarms about toxic flame retardants in foam-cushioned furniture and other products, people couldn’t find out exactly what chemicals were in the things they owned.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Many companies across the nation have complied with California’s 2014 flammability standard that allows furniture manufacturers not to use flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foam.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Americans have been exposed to potentially harmful flame retardant chemicals for decades. 
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, July 26, 2016

A new study bolstered evidence that gymnasts are highly exposed to fire retardant chemicals in landing mats and foam cubes in landing pits used to practice tumbling and vaults.

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, July 20, 2016

The nation’s new chemical safety law promises to give the Environmental Protection Agency expanded authority to regulate hazardous chemicals in consumer products. But of the tens of thousands of chemicals on the market, most never tested for safety, which should the EPA tackle first?
 

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News Release
Monday, July 11, 2016

Flame retardant chemicals linked to cancer and hormone disruption have been detected in a group of California children at higher levels than found in an earlier study of kids in New Jersey, EWG researchers said in a report released today.
 

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News Release
Friday, July 1, 2016

Today, a distinguished group of 50 scientists, health professionals and advocates called for urgent action to protect children from the harmful effects of toxic chemicals.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, June 23, 2016

The new study by EWG and Duke University researchers shows that the exposures to the two chemicals were higher in Calif. than in a similar study done earlier in N.J.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, March 2, 2016

The science of biomonitoring – measuring the chemical pollution in people – produces a seemingly unbroken stream of horror stories, with study after study reporting a new toxic threat building up in our bodies. So when a study shows declining levels of toxic chemicals in people, it’s good news – and encouraging proof that citizen action against hazardous chemicals works.

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Evidence of a chemical linked to cancer and hormone disruption was found in the urine of all babies tested for a new study from Duke University. The sources, researchers say, could be nursery gliders, car seats, bassinets and other baby products that might be treated with toxic fire retardants. The remains of a second chemical also linked to endocrine disruption were found in 93 percent of the infants tested.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Researchers found a fire-retardant chemical that could disrupt the hormone system in the urine of babies who were apparently exposed with baby products such as bassinets, car seats and nursery gliders, an alarming new study by Duke University reports. The chemical also can cause cancer.
 

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News Release
Monday, October 19, 2015

Researchers at Duke University and Environmental Working Group have found evidence of a suspected endocrine-disrupting chemical widely used in popular nail polishes in the bodies of more than two-dozen women who participated in a biomonitoring study. The study, published today in Environmental International, found that all women had a metabolite of triphenyl phosphate, or TPHP, in their bodies just 10 to 14 hours after painting their nails.http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412015300714

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