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Food

Food should be good for you. But some foods aren’t. Pesticides are sprayed on millions of acres every year and some of them end up on your food. Our broken farm subsidy system encourages over production of the wrong food. EWG is pushing for better policy and more sustainable ways of farming that produce healthy food in a healthy environment. 

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Pregnant women who follow the federal government's draft dietary advice could eat too much fish high in toxic mercury, which is harmful to the developing brains of fetuses, babies and young children, according to a new EWG study of women nationwide. At the same time, they could fail to get enough of the omega-3 fatty acids essential to their babies’ healthy development.
 

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News Release
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Federal agencies advise women who are pregnant, nursing or planning to become pregnant to eat 8-to-12 ounces a week of low-mercury seafood.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

In a major win for consumers, Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) failed to earn the votes he needed to stop debate on a bill known to opponents as the Deny Americans the Right to Know Act, or DARK Act.

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News Release
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Over the last three election cycles, Big Food and Ag businesses and organizations have donated more than $2.5 million to members of the Senate Agriculture Committee and over $8.5 million to Senate candidates overall, a new analysis by EWG shows.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

In 2014, federal agencies issued draft recommendations that women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or might become pregnant and young children eat more fish that is lower in mercury. Their advice is based on the fact that seafood consumption is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids and other nutrients.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Last night (March 14) Sen.Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) filed a new version of the bill we call the Deny Americans the Right to Know, or DARK, Act. Unfortunately, this new proposal is not much better than the previous versions we’ve seen.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, March 15, 2016

The new version of the DARK Act introduced by Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kan.) would allow companies to voluntarily rely on toll-free numbers and websites instead of labels to inform American consumers whether their food was produced with genetic engineering.
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, March 15, 2016

More meat and fish from genetically engineered animals could be coming to your dinner plate.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, March 14, 2016

Today, Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kans.) filed the latest version of a bill known by opponents as the Deny Americans the Right to Know Act, or DARK Act, which the full Senate will likely consider this week.

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News Release
Monday, March 14, 2016

Editorial boards across the country have been weighing in about the wrong-headed “Deny Americans the Right to Know,” or DARK, Act. Whether they favor GMO labeling or simply reject the notion of blocking the states’ right to pass their own labeling requirements, these editorial boards all see things the way we do: It’s vital to stop the DARK Act from passing in the Senate.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, March 14, 2016

Eating peanuts during infancy – rather than avoiding them – may be the key to preventing long-term peanut allergies in children. The benefit of early exposure persists even if kids later take a year-long break from eating any peanut foods, according to a new study from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (part of the National Institutes of Health), conducted by the Institute-funded Immune Tolerance Network.
 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, March 10, 2016

In the debate over labeling foods that contain genetically modified ingredients, one of the most frequently repeated arguments against state GMO-labeling laws is this: that state laws will create a “patchwork quilt” of varying requirements that will force food producers to use different labels in different states. Everyone from food and farm lobbyists to legislators repeat the claim that varying state GMO-labeling laws will put huge new burdens on food companies and ultimately drive up the price of food.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 9, 2016

In a recent interview for New York magazine’s Grub Street, author and food activist Michael Pollan laid out why he believes that food containing genetically modified ingredients (GMOs) should be labeled – and why GMO crops have been bad for the environment.
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, March 2, 2016

EWG applauds Sen. Jeff Merkley (D- Ore.) for introducing a common-sense approach to GMO labeling that both the food industry and consumer groups can support. 

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News Release
Tuesday, March 1, 2016

The Environmental Working Group issued the following statement today after the Senate Agriculture Committee narrowly passed a version of the House-adopted Deny Americans the Right to Know, or DARK Act.

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News Release
Friday, February 26, 2016

Will consumers use their smartphones to figure whether the food they’re buying contains genetically engineered ingredients, or GMOs?

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, February 25, 2016

I love chefs. They make delicious meals, create food innovations to tantalize our taste buds and have (arguably) some of the best reality TV shows. And now they’ve come together to stand up for our right to know what’s in our food and how it’s made.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, February 25, 2016

Big food and biotechnology companies and trade associations seeking to block labeling of food with genetically modified organisms through a rider in the end-of-the year federal spending bill have reported spending $75.5 million on lobbying from January through September of this year.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Labeling food that contains genetically engineered, or “GMO,” ingredients will not cost the preposterous $81.9 billion that the corn industry claims. The new study – paid for by the Corn Refiners Association – greatly exaggerates the cost of labeling products that contain GMOs.

 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Monday, February 22, 2016

Busy consumers want ingredients disclosed on food labels – not embedded in electronic codes that must be scanned with a smart phone.
 

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AgMag
Blog Post

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