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Energy

The Environmental Working Group's hard-hitting energy investigations hold energy producers accountable and point the way toward conservation and cleaner energy. EWG scrutinizes drilling and hydraulic fracturing for natural gas and oil, use of ethanol to power vehicles, wood-burning electricity generation, uranium mining and nuclear power.

Sunday, July 1, 2001

View and Download our report here: Uncontrolled Lusts

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, June 14, 2001

View and Download the report here: EWG Corn Ethanol Energy Security

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, November 8, 2000

Choosing Green Energy: A Consumer's Guide to Sustainable Electricity

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, October 17, 2000

By John Coequyt, Richard Wiles, October 2000

View and Download the report here: Fuzzy Air

Summary

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, November 3, 1999

The Justice Department and USEPA announced actions against 32 power plants that they claim are operating in violation of the Clean Air Act.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, September 2, 1999

Most voters do not know that George W. Bush's policy advisors typically work for corporate front groups working for goals far outside the mainstream environmental perspective.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, September 1, 1999

Urban and suburban high- ways account for less than three percent of road miles in metropolitan areas, yet they carry more than one third of all vehicle miles traveled in our nation’s cities and suburbs. As Congress tackles reauthorization of the nation’s transportation law, the 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation and Efficiency Act (ISTEA), these interstates, free- ways, and expressways — the vital core of the country’s road network — are crumbling. The main reason is that each year state Departments of Transportation (DOTs) divert billions of dollars available for road repair to the construction of new highways, typically on the suburban fringe.

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Tuesday, August 24, 1999

In the five years before electricity deregulation, California utilities cut funding in half for programs that save energy, save customers money, and help save the environment.

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News Release
Tuesday, August 24, 1999

In the five years before electricity deregulation, California utilities cut funding in half for programs that save energy, save customers money, and help save the environment. According to an analysis of federal data by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), the wasted energy would supply a year’s worth of power to more than 600,000 homes, and would have cost California consumers almost $450 million at pre-deregulation rates.

 
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Thursday, July 1, 1999

View and Download our report here: Up In Smoke

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Saturday, May 1, 1999

An Environmental Working Group analysis of recently released enforcement records from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) reveals a persistent pattern of “significant violations” of the Clean Air Act (CAA) in five major industries. Hundreds of large facilities in auto assembly, iron and steel, petroleum refining, pulp manufacturing, and metal smelting and refining are threatening the public health by their repeated failure to comply with federal clean air safeguards. Worse, there has been little effort by state or federal officials to bring even the most flagrant offenders into compliance with current statutory requirements.

 

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Friday, October 2, 1998

By cutting energy efficiency programs almost in half, electric utilities are sticking consumers with bigger electric bills and dirty air, concludes Unplugged, a new study by the Environmental Working Group and World Wildlife Fund.

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News Release
Thursday, October 1, 1998

The summer of 1998 was the hottest on record, and that’s saying something. After all, the seven warmest years since scientists began keeping records in 1853 have all occurred in the past ten years, and 1997 was the warmest ever. So far, every month of 1998 has broken the temperature record for that month, and July 1998 was the single hottest month on record (NOAA 1998). To put it another way, we’ve probably just lived through the hottest seven-month period in 600 years.

 

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Tuesday, September 30, 1997

Florida has some of the cleanest air in the nation. The "Sunshine State's" air is so pure, in fact, that 66 out of 67 counties in Florida already comply with tough new Federal clean air standards for soot and ground-level ozone announced by President Clinton in July.

 
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Thursday, June 12, 1997

Although farming contributes little to the problem of airborne toxic particles, farmers suddenly find themselves in the middle of a heated battle over an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposal to improve air quality by reducing emissions from electric utilities, chemical plants and oil companies.

 

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Thursday, May 1, 1997

Tens of thousands of people die prematurely each year from microscopic toxic particles in the air we breathe. To reduce particle pollution to safe levels, EPA has proposed updating the decade-old health standard for so-called “particulate matter”. According to the EPA, updated health standards, in combination with other ongoing pollution control initiatives, will save 35,000 lives each year (EPA 1997).

 

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Thursday, January 9, 1997

On Nov. 27, 1996, the Clinton Administration proposed new regulations to clean up an especially deadly form of air pollution--tiny particles that penetrate deep into human lungs, claiming the lives of more than 64,000 Americans every year (EPA 1993, NRDC 1996). The rule also proposes new standards for ground-level ozone, an issue which is not addressed in this study.

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